Home » Reviews » IconograpH

IconograpH

OSIAN eyeing global stage:Tuli

 

Neville Tuli of OsianIconograph/Ravi V.Chhabra


OSIAN-Cinefan Chairman Neville Tuli spoke  to fnbworld about  the New Delhi-based organization's forays into making the Indian cinema movement into a world showcase, calling it a "Swaraj for the artsts".


Tuli believes that it is time all serious artistic work, especially cinema is looked into as a commercial activity without compromising the aesthetics. The industry and its funding bodies both overt and covert have far treated it as a miniscule compartmentalized industry. How can we even think about Indian cinema as an industry when it contributes a mere point one per cent to the economy!

 

Compare this with Hollywood and one will know the difference. Tuli believes that it is time all serious artistic work, especially cinema is looked into as a commercial activity without compromising the aesthetics. The industry and its funding bodies both overt and covert have far treated it as a miniscule compartmentalized industry. 


Tuli said the responsibility is towards a much larger infrastructure building process and by six-years of work, we intend to change India's cultural and artistic infrastructure, people's attitude towards creativity and make it a financially independent entity. We need to spread the knowledge basis of our country with a greater sensitivity and slowly make art as a centre of India's developmental processes.


Cinema is evolving and the attitudes are deep-seated. We change a lakh people at a time, within a period of two to three years, millions of Indians will be open to different cinemas of the world and very soon cinema would be recognised as a creative art form, he explained. "Two years back, people wouldn't want to view a film without song and dance sequences and an unknown lead cast. But today they have a refined sensitivity towards cinema. In order to appreciate the aesthetics of cinema it is important to respect and understand its history. This develops nostalgia that tackles ones intellectual problem, he added. His vision is to build an OSIAN-backed university for arts and humanities whose focus would be to give the students a direct access to the primary sources of creativity that will give them knowledge and confidence.

"For cinema to come of age, it cannot compromise on creativity for the sake of entertainment. I totally believe in good cinema and bad cinema and do not believe in categorizing them on the basis of genre. Be it parallel or mainstream cinema, the highpoint of every cinema is to it connect with the audience", he feels.



RETAKE/Ravi V.Chhabra

 

Film: Swapner Din (Chased By Dreams) Language: Bengali Cast: Prosenjit, Riya Sen, Raima sen, Rajesh Sharma, Arijit Datta, Gautam. Direction/screenplay: Buddhadeb Dasgupta


The rusty jeep cruised on the bumpy road in the din of night. The shadows of huge trees on both sides of the road were hauntful in the starless sky. Paresh pensively stared out of the window of the jeep headed towards the village. His 16mm film projector creaked as the vehicle snarled on the bumpy, muddy road. It had all begun with a dream for Paresh who wished to find the girl of his dreams and for Chapal, the substitute jeep driver who dreamt of making it big in Dubai.


The hallmark of the story is the shots taken at night. Complemented with phenomenal background music, this Buddhadeb Dasgupta directed flick, Swapner Din (Chased By Dreams) sensitively tells the tale of the three characters, Paresh, Chapal and Amina, who set out to chase their dreams.


According to Buddhadeb Dasgupta, the reason for the bluish tones in the film is to make the morning a cause of celebration after a prolonged blackness. On losing his projector, Paresh realises that his job is in peril. He goes combing for the device from village to village, but all efforts go invain. He gets duped by two villagers in his hunt for the projector and loses all hope in life and love.

 

Though certain frames have been dragged exceedingly, Swapner Din marks the celebration of meaningful cinema at the 7th OSIAN-Cinefan film festival. The director has done justice with the three central characters, especially the staccato of night shots that build up the viewer's hopes to witness the much awaited dawn. After winning the special Directors award for "The wrestlers at Venice" in 2000, Swapner Din is his second successive film to be included in the Masters series of the Toronto film festival. The script paces with the killing of infiltrants across the India-Bangladesh border in the background. The curtains close as the seemingly perpetual darkness wanes to a new morning with Paresh and Amina finally reaching their destinations. 

A scene from Swapner  Din